Tag Archives: open source

Dotless 1.4.4 is out

Idle hands do… open source?

During the last few weeks, I’ve done something I’ve wanted to do for a longer time, and stepped up my involvement in Free Software somewhat. It started out as kind of an accident: I was encountering an annoying bug that I attributed to our usage of dotless in one of our projects, and I went to the issue tracker looking for reports of a similar problem. Having looked at the tracker for a moment, I then checked the corresponding code and noted that, yes, dotless does in fact do the correct thing. Then I proceeded to look at my own code, and it took me all of five seconds to spot the obvious bug.

A bit embarrassing, sure, but not useless. Because while I was looking through the issue tracker, I noted that some of the issues were of a fairly simple nature — maybe even something I could fix? I remembered fixing a bug back in ’10, so I then went through the list of closed pull requests, and noted that I had contributed no less than five PRs.

During that weekend, I came down with the flu and skipped work. However, I used some of that downtime to work on dotless — given that I had no time constraints or expectations of efficiency, I could spend a moment here and another there to fix a bug or two. First, I ended up going for the low-hanging fruit. I ended up creating about a dozen pull requests — some with bug fixes, some with actual new features.

After giving things about a week to settle, I then asked the current maintainers if they might accept me as a core contributor, since they didn’t seem to have the time to process the pull requests. Not long after that Daniel granted me contributor access to the project, and off I went, merging the PRs in and cleaning up the issue tracker.

Sweet release

Of course, not everything went perfectly: I intended to release dotless 1.4.3 about a week after having merged the fixes in. And I did — except that I messed up the NuGet packaging so that the standalone dotless compiler was left out of the package. And instead of releasing 1.4.3.1 with the fixed package as I should have, I bumped up the version to 1.4.4. I expect that won’t be much of a problem for anyone, though, so I’m not feeling too bad. After all, I did fix a number of inconsistencies, crashers and things like Bootstrap not compiling when minified. So maybe I can forgive myself a bit of a blunder there. :-)

What next?

The less.js guys are thinking about building a .NET wrapper around less.js. It’s an interesting idea, to be sure: that way, the .NET implementation would never need to play catch-up with the official version. However, I still believe there’s merit in having a “native” .NET implementation, so I’m going to keep at it for now.

For the next release, I’ve already got @import options, variable interpolation improvements, list arguments and improved mixin guards. Porting the less.js test cases to give me a rough idea of how far behind is a logical next step. I’d like to aim for feature parity for 1.5 — on the other hand, maybe more frequent releases with smaller, incremental improvements would better serve the project. At the very least, 1.5 should fully support Bootstrap and KendoUI.

A large slice of my professional history is in line-of-business software with user bases ranging in the dozens or hundreds. It’s exciting and a bit frightening to be taking responsibility of a project that has, over the course of years, been downloaded over 400 000 times from NuGet.org. Time to see if I’m up to the task!