Chapter 6: The Three Great Obstacles to Innovation

(This is part 6 in a series of posts where I document my progress through reading Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach by Gerald Weinberg, answering the questions at the end of each chapter)

1. Knowing what you had for dessert is an application of general self-awareness to the question of health.

“How aware are you of your own health and how it affects your leadership style? How do you feel right now? Take an inventory of your physical condition, and describe how it currently affects your performance as a leader.”

I’m in poor shape, although I’ve been worse. I feel tired, and I’ve got all sorts of aches and pains all over the place. On occasion, it plays merry hell with my ability to focus, and I’m sure that if I were healthier, I’d also seem happier, which would certainly have a positive effect on people around me.

2. Poor health is an obstacle to innovation and just about everything else.

“How is your long-term health affected by your career? What is your health going to be like in the future? If you have a hard time answering that question, what makes you think your health is not under your own control? What are you doing to keep it under your own control? How will it affect your career in the future?”

Stress and longer work days affect the way I eat – the more tired I am, the less likely I am to prepare a proper meal. Instead, I tend to opt for a pizza. In the future, I’m going to go for less stress and a healthier diet. Keeping that in mind might affect the choices I make, career-wise.

3. In answering the previous two questions, did you respond that your health was “no problem”?

“What does that tell you about yourself?”

No, I didn’t. It tells me I’m not fooling myself. 🙂

4. Do you know your IQ?

“Do you let other people know? Does knowing your IQ affect your ability to lead? How?”

Not accurately, but I’ve done the Mensa online test, so I’ve got a rough idea. I don’t let other people know, because I’m fairly sure it would only serve to provoke feelings of either superiority or inferiority in others, neither of which seems beneficial. It’s been quite a while since I last thought about my IQ before reading this question, so I can safely say it doesn’t affect my ability to lead in the least.

Come to think of it, I tend to assess people based on their performance, attitude, competence and suchlike, instead of any perceived ‘intelligence’.

5. Do you like to take tests?

“If you knew you were assured of doing well, would you like to take a test? What if you were assured of doing poorly? What if you had to take the test, but were never to find out how well you did? What do these questions have to do with leadership style?”

Yes, I do. If I knew I’d do perfectly, I wouldn’t bother . In every other case, I’d do it just to confirm whether the assurances would hold.

If I wouldn’t have the chance to process how well I did, I wouldn’t see the point either.

If this says anything about my leadership style, it’s that I base my work on feedback.

6. Find some multiple choice quiz and go through it in the following way:

“Instead of picking one answer, take each answer in turn and give a good reason why that could be the answer. Then give a good reason for some answer that isn’t among the choices.”

7. Next time you’re in a meeting and several ideas are brought up, apply the technique of the previous question.

“That is, make sure you give a good reason to the meeting’s participants to explain why each idea could be the solution you’re seeking. Then offer at least one more.”

Both of the questions above ask me to do something, but not report the results. Instead of posting the answers, I’m going to go with what the exercise made me think.

In the multiple choice question, I felt like I was exploring the possibilities. It was the same with the meeting, except for one detail: with the other participants, it kind of made me feel like I couldn’t actually answer the question, for a while. Eventually, I did pick an option and put my (considerable) weight behind it, though.


Previously: Chapter 5: But I Can’t Because…  Next up: Chapter 7: A Tool for Developing Self-Awareness

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *